Repurchase Agreement Liabilities

Repurchase Agreement Liabilities

Treasury or treasury bonds, corporate and treasury bonds, government bonds and equities can all be used as “guarantees” in a repurchase transaction. However, unlike a secured loan, the right to securities is transferred from the seller to the buyer. Coupons (interest payable to the owner of the securities) that mature while the pension buyer owns the securities are usually passed directly on the seller of securities. This may seem counter-intuitive, given that the legal ownership of the guarantees during the pension agreement belongs to the purchaser. Rather, the agreement could provide that the buyer will receive the coupon, with the money to be paid in the event of a buyback being adjusted as compensation, although this is rather typical of the sale/buyback. In some cases, the underlying security may lose its market value for the duration of the pension agreement. The buyer can ask the seller to finance a margin account on which the price difference is identified. Pension transactions are generally considered to be a reduction in credit risk. The biggest risk in a repo is that the seller does not maintain his contract by not repuring the securities he sold on the due date. In these cases, the purchaser of the guarantee can then liquidate the guarantee in an attempt to recover the money he originally paid.

However, the reason this is an inherent risk is that the value of the warranty may have decreased since the first sale and therefore cannot leave the buyer with any choice but to maintain the security he never wanted to maintain in the long term, or to sell it for a loss. On the other hand, this transaction also poses a risk to the borrower; If the value of the guarantee increases beyond the agreed terms, the creditor cannot resell the guarantee. Under a pension contract, the Federal Reserve (Fed) buys U.S. Treasury bonds, U.S. agency securities or mortgage-backed securities from a primary trader who agrees to buy them back within one to seven days; an inverted deposit is the opposite. This is how the Fed describes these transactions from the perspective of the counterparty and not from its own point of view.


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